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Tree Terminology

These are sharp climbing aids that are jabbed into the trunk and branches therefore wounding the tree. These are only used in full tree removals and will not be used while pruning your trees.

When necessary, the foliage is raised for the clearance of vehicle or foot traffic, etc. It should be noted that this pruning does change the appearance of the tree and in most cases these limbs cannot be replaced. When completed, it is desirable to have at least half of the branches in the bottom two thirds of your tree.

Deadwooding is the removal of dead branches up to specific diameters. Deadwood removal is a health treatment. It reduces possible food sources for dangerous pests and can limit diseases. Well fed sources exert a strong force against your trees natural defence system. If your trees defence system is low on energy these sources will spread rapidly and your tree will waste additional energy to protect itself.

Class 1: Deadwood
Removal of the dead branches larger than 12mm (0.5 inch) in diameter (approximately the size of your little finger).

Class 2: Deadwood
Removal of the dead branches larger than 25mm (1 inch) in diameter (approximately the size of a dollar coin).

Class 3: Deadwood
Removal of the dead branches larger than 50mm (2 inches) in diameter (appropriately the width of a credit card).

Class 4: Deadwood
Removal of specific dead branches.

This involves grinding of the visible tree stump to below ground level. You can avoid the cost of repairs to underground services that may be damaged in the process by notifying us of their exact location. The stump hole will be back filled with stump chips and the excess chips are left on site unless otherwise organised at the time of quoting.

Thinning includes crown clearing and the selective removal of branches to increased light penetration and air movement through the crown. Increased light and air stimulates and maintains interior foliage, which in turn improves branch taper and strength. Thinning reduces the wind ail effect and the weight of the heavy limbs.

Thinning can emphasize the structural beauty of the trunk and branches as well as increasing the growth of plants underneath by increased light penetration. When thinning the crown of a mature tree, seldom should more than one quarter of the live foliage be removed.

At least one half of the foliage should be branches that arise in the lower two thirds of the tree. Likewise, when thinning laterals from a limb, an effort should be made to leave the same distribution of foliage along the branch.

Pruning enhances tree growth by removing the dead and diseased branches which cause the trees distress and unstable growth. Pruning is divided into technical classes. This may also involve some thinning which may be done independently.

Class 1: Fine Pruning
Consists of removal of dead and diseased tissue, crossing and weak branches. This includes branches on the main trunks as well as those inside the lead area down to 12mm (0.5 inch) in diameter. (Approximately the size of your little finger).

Class 2: Medium Pruning
Consists of removal of dead and diseased tissue, crossing and weak branches. This includes branches on the main trunks as well as those inside the lead area down to 25mm (1 inch) in diameter. (Approximately the size of a dollar coin).

Class 3: Coarse Pruning
Consists of removal of dead and diseased tissue, crossing and weak branches. This includes branches on the main trunks as well as those inside the lead area down to 50mm (2 inches) in diameter. (Approximately the width of a credit card).

Class 4: Selective Pruning
The removal of specific branches without being detrimental to the health of the tree.

Class 5: Reduction Pruning
Consists of the reduction of top, sides, under-branches or individual branches, without detriment to the health of the tree. This practice is undertaken in case of utility line interference, clearance, or specific topiary training or pollarding.

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